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Barton upon Humber



The Anglo-Saxon tower on St. Peter's Church in Barton upon Humber is one of England's best. It dates from about 970 AD. The floor of the church has been completely excavated. Archeologists found that the original church consisted of the tower, an eastern extension and a western extension.

Since 1972 the church has been in the care of English Heritage. It has been closed for restoration and will reopen on 26 May 2007 with a new exhibition "Buried Lives". From 26 May to 30 September it is open seven days a week from 10 am to 5 pm. From October to 20 March it is open on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday from 10 am to 4 pm. The first picture below is of the exterior of the church and the second picture is of the interior.

St Peters Church Barton upon Humber


Copyright David Wright
Geograph British Isles, Creative Commons


Interior St Peters Church

Copyright David Wright
Geograph British Isles, Creative Commons


Another church in Barton upon Humber well worth a visit is St. Mary's which dates from about 1170. It contains Brasses from the 14th and 15th Centuries.



Just a few miles from Barton on Humber is Thornton Abbey. The abbey was closed in 1539 during the dissolution and today it is nothing but a ruin except for the gate house. The abbey including the gatehouse are in the care of English Heritage. It was in the gatehouse that a skeleton was found in a bricked up room sitting at a table with a book, a pen, and ink. This has given rise to many rumours that the abbey is haunted. It is unusual for an abbey to have a gate house. Since it was built shortly after the Peasant's Revolt of 1381 it is thought perhaps it was used to house the abbey's treasures.

Thornton Abbey Gatehouse

Copyright David Wright
Geograph British Isles, Creative Commons

The abbey has been closed for restoration work and will reopen 30 May 2007 with some new features discovered during the restoration. From July to September it is open seven days a week from 10 am to 5 pm. From October to 20 March it is open Friday, Saturday, and Sunday 10 am to 4 pm.

Baysgarth House was possibly built in the Middle Ages but no one knows for sure. It certainly did exist before 1557 when records show the ownership passed to Edward Naylor. It has been a museum since 1981 which is located in the south wing and includes the stable block and Baysgarth Cottage. In addition to beautiful Georgian and Victorian rooms there are reconstructed stonemason, shoemaker, and wheelwright's shops. The museum also has a large photographic collection of historic Barton upon Humber. The house is surrounded by 30 acres of parkland which is open to the public daily. The museum itself is open Friday, Saturday, and Sunday from 12 noon to 4 pm. Admission and parking are free.

Baysgarth House Museum

Copyright David Wright
Geograph British Isles, Creative Commons



Two Nature Reserves in Barton upon Humber

Far Ings Nature Reserve is a haven for birds, insects, wildflowers, and butterflies. There are eight hides from which to watch the wildlife around the lakes and river. Toilet facilities are at the visitor's center.

Waters' Edge Country Park nature reserve is unique for its Wildlife Surveillance Network which is a series of cameras trained on certain areas of the park. Through these cameras the visitor can watch wildlife "up close". Admission is free.

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